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up as a guest of his majesty's government -- in days, pamela was taken with him and in weeks she was taken by him. i thought, that is a good one. >> is there any evidence that there are things in this book that have never been published before? >> there are no new memos released by the british government. i think my take on the fact that churchill never believed the invasion was coming and had the scare to build up his forces -- i have never seen it developed quite that way. the numbers of german ships in his pocket -- he knew them. the germans would take every ship they had and everything they could steal from norway and sweden to put their 96,000 troops on and would be slaughtered on the way to england by the royal navy and that would be the end of the war. the whole hollywood industry of lying -- the invasion of england, we will fight on the beaches -- he never believed they were coming for a minute. if it were to come, he would lose the war. >> i would love to ask you about 1400 more questions, but we have to let you go. we kept you an hour and a half. paul reid, thank you. t
don't remember his name. the fact the could not remember what departments or in the government is a little forgivable. i did it for the same reason, in many respects. i wanted to deal with something i like, that i thought was worth pursuing. a long time ago i did a book called "the emerging republican majority.: it pretty much did emerge. i thought i would take the methodology that i used in the book to try to, with a good explanation, a realignment of 1775. that is a good part of what this new book is about. >> before we get into this, would you deal with one comment that i saw on the web written by weisburg a number of years ago. he called you a liberal. >> i don't think i have ever been what i would call a liberal. somebody might call me a progressive. certainly even within the republican party for a long time there was a major progressive movements. but, liberal, i don't think so. outsider, antiestablishment, but not liberal and not merely conservative either. i would not accept either of those labels. i understand it does not stop with those labels. in terms of the politic
was there in 1941 and avril harriman shows up as a guest of his majesty's government and within days pamela was taken with harriman and then within weeks she was taken by him. host: is there any sense from the research that there are things in there book that have never been published? guest: there are no new memos released by the british government. i think my take on the fact that churchill never believed the invasion was coming and, he foisted the scare to build up his forces i have never seen it develop that way. he kept the numbers of german ships in his pocket. he knew that the germans would need every ship they had and all they could steal from norway and sweden to put their 90,000 troops on and they would be slaughtered on the way to england by the royal navy and that would be the end of the war. and the whole hollywood industry of sea lion, the invasion of england and the search lights in the sky and we will fight on the beaches, he never believed they were coming, not for a minute. because were they to come they would lose the war. host: i would love to ask you questions but more
the departments in the government, i guess it is a little forgivable. i did it for the same reason in many respects. i wanted to deal with something i liked, that i thought was worth pursuing. and a long time ago, i did a book called "the emerging republican majority." i thought i would take the methodologies that i would use in that book and try to come up with a good explanation of the realignment of 1775. that is a good part of what this new book is about. >> before we get into this, a number of years ago, he called you a liberal. we have known you over the years as supposedly a conservative. and does your own views on liberal conservatives now pierre .> wrot i was always a bit more of a populist. been't think i have ever where i would call a liberal. somebody might call me a progressive. certainly even within the republican party. outsider, and i-establishment carrion, -- anti-a stable monetary and -- anti establishmentarian. >> what did you think of richard nixon when you worked with him? >> i liked him better after i wasn't working with him and he was out of the presidency. he is a v
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)